Jonesville Field Guide Entry #507

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Jefferson Davis, President of the Confederate States of America, is associated with at least three different Union County houses still standing: the Wallace, JRR Giles and Cross Keys homes.

According to many accounts, including the one below from the May 27, 1865 edition

Rumor has it Jefferson Davis, President of the Confederacy, had much in common with this image from the 1970s cult classic The Rocky Horror Picture Show.

of Harper’s Weekly, was dressed as a woman when he was captured.

The firing in this skirmish was the first warning that Davis received. The captors report that he hastily put on one of his wife’s dresses and started for the woods, closely followed by our men, who at first thought him a woman, but seeing his boots while he was running, they suspected his sex at once. The race was a short one, and the rebel President was soon brought to bay. He brandished a bowie-knife and showed signs of battle, but yielded promptly to the persuasions of Colt’s revolvers, without compelling the men to fire. He expressed great indignation at the energy with which he was pursued, saying that he had believed our Government were too magnanimous to hunt down women and children. Mrs. Davis remarked to Colonel Harden, after the excitement was over, that the men had better not provoke the President, or “he might hurt some of ’em.” Reagon behaves himself with dignity and resignation. The party, evidently, were making for the coast. —   J. H. Wilson, Brevet Major-General.

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–Tim Bryant
Author of Blue Rubber Pool
Surf Director at Pineapple Hill

 

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Trivia: Tahiti, pouques, kava and more

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News and information for enjoying the island lifestyle (beaches, sailing, surfing and such) …wherever the hell you are.

…About one-third of North America is bordered by barrier islands.///

…In ancient Tahiti, archery was a sacred sport, practiced only by people of high rank. And while they were expert marksmen, bows and arrows were never used as weapons of war.///

This knot is called a monkey’s fist. Try making one sometime. Then take up drinking.

…The people from the islands of Jersey and Guernsey, just off the coast of  France, think they are descendants of fairies, known on the islands as “pouques” (pronounced “pooks”)! The last reported sighting of a fairy was in the early 1900’s.///

…The roots of the South Pacific kava plant are used to produce a drink with sedative and anesthetic properties. When Captain Cook and his crew first witnessed the preparation of kava by mastication, they were thoroughly disgusted.///

…About 70 percent of the planet is ocean, with an average depth of more than 12,400 feet. Given that photons (light) can’t penetrate more than 330 feet below the water’s surface, most of our planet is in a perpetual state of darkness.///

…A monkey’s fist or monkey paw is a type of knot, so named because it looks somewhat like a small bunched fist/paw. It is tied at the end of a rope to serve as a weight, making it easier to throw, and also as an ornamental knot. This type of weighted rope can be used as an improvised weapon, called a slingshot by sailors. It was also used in the past as an anchor in rock climbing, by stuffing it into a crack, but this is obsolete and dangerous.///

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— Tim Bryant
Author of Blue Rubber Pool

Surf Director at Pineapple Hill

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The Tuesday Morning Woody: 1957 Walsted Folkboat

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Looking for a used wooden sailboat that’s trailerable. This could be a great restoration project. Built in 1957–and the boatyard that built it is still going.
For sale on Ebay is a 25 footer with 7-foot beam. Teak decking, inboard 2 cylinder diesel, miscellaneous sails. Trailer needs new axles, tires and rims.
Get out your checkbook. Take her home. Then get your checkbook out a lot more. See it here.
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–Tim Bryant
Surf Director at Pineapple Hill
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Book Review: Gringos in Paradise

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The gates between the United States and Mexico open in both directions. People coming into the USA seeking a better quality of life meet people heading into Mexico seeking the same thing.

This summer, at the Pages on Pine used book store in Spartanburg I bought Barry Golson’s Gringos In Paradise because the sub-title—An American Couple Builds Their Retirement Dream House in a Seaside Village in Mexico—caught my attention. I was curious how their experience building in Mexico compared to what I went through  building in Jonesville, and whether or not they had done much document forging with “Gassoway Oil & Gas Co., 1924” embossing stamp like the one I still have it. They hadn’t, btw, but they had a few tricks of their own.

I enjoyed the book ‘s description of the Mexican people’s emphasis on family and friends, odd viewpoint on punctuality,  wide, near bi-polar swings between laid back and passionate moods. It did a nice job describing the handsome terrain and easy climate and the Mexican difference between corruption and “augmentation”. And, of course, it gave an eye-opening walk through on the hoops and ladders of getting a house on its feet.

The Golsons, in Mexico, had building codes while my builder never mentioned them  where I am. We both had house plans that began as rough sketches—theirs scratched in the dirt, mine on the back of a manila envelope—and both ditched the sketched in favor of actual professional drawn up plans due to not trusting sketches. And but neither their plan nor ours synced up with the concepts of budget and deadline.

Not wanting to give too much away I’ll just say that building a house is a totally crazy adventure whether in Spanish or English. Btw, both of us experienced it in both languages.

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— Tim Bryant
Author of Blue Rubber Pool
Surf Director at Pineapple Hill

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The Tuesday Morning Woody 1935 Crocker Ketch

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Wooden sailboat for sale: In the second floor hammock at Pineapple Hill, waiting to see which way Hurricane Florence will turn, toward me in Upstate South Carolina, or toward other people in upstairs hammocks, I went window shopping and came up with this 1935 Crocker Ketch.

I like wooden sailboats. I like ketches. I like the price on this one, $45,900, knowing that’s only the cost of admission. The real money comes immediately after the title transfer.

But what the hey. Check this one out on yachtworld .

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–Tim Bryant
Surf Director at Pineapple Hill

 

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If it’s true that islands have souls

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It’s easy to get caught up in the notion of islands being warm romantic lazy places composed mostly of tanned vacationers slathered slick with coconut oil sprawled out on tropical-colored beach chairs and blankets while barely still able to hold sweet umbrella drinks.

To me, there are other islands just as captivating: cold and perhaps even barren ones where generations have risen in the dark early hours over cups of thick black coffee before heading out to work.

And by that I mean hard work: mending nets, crabbing, raking up oysters or seeding new beds, battling rust and barnacles with a wire brush, reaching elbow deep into a dirty and defiant diesel engine, gutting fish and tossing bits of it to screeching sea birds as the sun is just now coming up.

If it’s true that islands have souls, surely it is places like this where the older souls are to be found.

Sometimes I forget.

Sometimes I too easily take the path of least resistance—toward Hawaiian shirts and sandals versus flannel and heavy boots.

It’s a weakness I’ve battled most of my life.

But then something comes along to remind me of the San Juans or Newfoundland or other places where island life remains isolated and hard and so deeply quiet that even the waves are mute.

When I find such a spot, even if it is only in a picture or a story or a song, it takes me further into the depths of my bones than I am used to going these last many years. It reminds me not to become too comfortable with white sanded landscapes dotted with brightly colored swimwear.

Why?

Because there will come a day when I no longer seek tranquil turquoise coves under a big fat yellow sun but instead desire gray mad skies over foaming seas flashing their teeth, making me feel so very much alive again as only such things can.

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–Tim Bryant
Author of
Surf Director at Pineapple Hill

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Bolger Stitch and Glue

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As it looked in the USED CAR LOT
As it looked in the USED CAR LOT.

After sailboats 30′ and up, I never thought I’d enjoy having a small skiff but then I found this small wooden “stitch and glue” oar/sail Gunther rigged skiff at used car lot in Charlotte.

I thought it to be an Otter 16 but the guys at the Wooden Boat forum have convinced me it’s a Phil Bolger Gypsy design. TheWooden Boat forum is definitely a big help.

Of course, sailing it is different than bigger boats. No room to stretch and move around. No place to get out of bad weather. No space to stash several months provisions. But it’s fun to sit closer to the water and closer-to-nature. And there’s virtually no maintenance hassles. It’s very easy to row and I’ve set it up for a small trolling motor though have never put one aboard. What really makes it special right now is that I can sail the reservoir behind my house when the urge to sail hits and I’m unable to make the three hour trek to the sea.

There’s something about wooden boats versus fiberglass (plastic) that’s magical—as if you’re part of a living thing and it, the boat, is part of all living things around you: water, sky, fishes, birds, animals, etc. It’s a “close to nature” vibe.

I beefed up the mast step, added additional bench and deck boards (with finger holes to lift them up for storage underneath) and then gave it a paint job.

It’s now Pineapple Hill’s official Tongan War Skiff.

— Tim Bryant
Author of Blue Rubber Pool
Surf Director at Pineapple Hill


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Cats and Gravity Cartoon

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[Rooting through that box from the liquor store where I toss my writings and doodles, I found a bunch of cartoon sketches from 30 years ago.]

 

This one describes experiments conducted by a guy named Harold. The caption says “After 97 trials, Harold proved that cats don’t ALWAYS land on their feet.” Harold’s white board presentation depicts a 14-story building with Harold on top and the point of impact below. Plus, for good measure, a close up of cat’s feet.

–Tim Bryant
Surf Director at Pineapple Hill

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Don’t pick up baby deer

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Transitioning to country life —whether from jungle, sea or city—  requires learning local customs to avoid calling attention to yourself.

For instance, don’t pick up baby deer.

Just because there’s so many all around and they’re so damned cute (big brown eyes and spindly legs just like Bambi), you cannot gather a bouquet of them as a gift for someone you love.

Not even on Valentine’s Day, birthdays or anniversaries.

Nope. Don’t do it says the DNR (Department of Natural Resources). Leave ‘em alone. Don’t try to pet them or pick them up. They say the mother is probably somewhere near. Hiding. Like I am. Unless you already found her with your AR-50. In that case, hide the AR-50 and call the DNR at (803) 734-3898  to come get Bambi.

PS fyi, if I see a baby deer I’m gonna wanna try to pet it. And then I’m gonna wanna let it hang out all the time, use the TV remote when it wants.

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— Tim Bryant
Author of Blue Rubber Pool

Surf Director at Pineapple Hill

 

 

 

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Say Goodbye To Fish Sticks?

Posted on Posted in Books & Writing, Notes & Doodles

Now they’re saying there’s not enough cod for fish sticks. Here’s a link to Tim McDonnell’s article on the New England’s cod fishery. You better pour some coffee first. Or something stronger.

Interested in books for the beach? check out some of Linda Greenlaw’s books Hungry Ocean, Lobster Chronicles, and Seaworthy. (You might remember her as the female sword fisherman portrayed in the movie The Perfect Storm.) She knows the industry and has a great writing voice to boot.

As for the fish skeleton wind vane photo, I hope it inspires a change in direction.

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–Tim Bryant
Author of Blue Rubber Pool
Surf Director at Pineapple Hill

 

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Are you up with SV Delos?

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My bud Palmer has been following SV Delos on You Tube for quite a while now but for some inexcusable reason didn’t hook me up until yesterday. Why Palmer? Why?!!!

Follow this couple and their friends as they cruise under sail, scuba dive, snorkel, drink beer brands from beyond the known universe and generally make you want to quit your day job or, if like me you’ve already done that, quit your attempted relocation to boonies of Jonesville, South Carolina.

— Tim Bryant
Author of Blue Rubber Pool
Surf Director at Pineapple Hill

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Coffee on The Money Trail

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In Blue Rubber Pool, I write about the importance of coffee on The Money Trail. In the beginning, we had to scrounge, taking whatever we could get whenever it presented itself.  Moldy, rock-hard instant that we jazzed up

using candy bars when/if we had them (candy bars were often as unlikely as the coffee was). Almond Joys, Mounds, Reese’s Peanut Butter Cups, Zero bars…these would be broken into pieces added right before serving. Later, as we moved up in rank, locally grown beans made us spoiled connoisseurs. But some us still add Twix or Carlos V for old times’ sake.

–Tim Bryant
Author of Blue Rubber Pool
Surf Director at Pineapple HIll

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